yelyahwilliams:

hamacidal:

ultrafunnypictures:

You can read up to 500 words per minute


wowwwwww

yelyahwilliams:

hamacidal:

ultrafunnypictures:

You can read up to 500 words per minute

wowwwwww

(via theydonotexist)

homebodynobodies:

SEA OF APPROVAL - ANDY BULL (REVIEW)Island/Universal RecordsReleased: July 11, 2014
It’s very rare that an album can be so encapsulating and so powerful that it can transport you to an alternate world. Sea Of Approval, is one of those albums.
Very few artists have the ability to invite the listener into entering a multitude of sentiments within 10 tracks - which Andy Bull has executed faultlessly in his latest LP, out today.
Opening with a haunting, gripping track, Just One Expression Just One Line is the start of something completely unexpected and majorly impressive - 45 minutes of a carefully constructed record that solidifies Bull’s abilities to emotionally manipulate through exceptional hooks and formidable synths.
Jumping in with a more upbeat track, Baby I Am Nobody Now presents just a small taste of how complex and effortless Bull’s capability to transform the ambience of the record - yet still adhering to his clean-cut electro-pop sound.
It is the contrasting shift from Something I Guess to Keep On Running and Talk Too Much once again shows the intricacy of Andy Bull’s art form - providing strong rhythms with even more emotionally swaying vocals. 
Each carefully constructed component of Sea Of Approval manages to shift the mood and tone several times throughout, enabling the listener to endure every inch of emotion that each lyric carries. It is ridiculously easy to get emotionally attached to Sea Of Approval within the first listen, which is subjectively hard considering its heavy electro-pop nature of the record; but it is Bull’s evident passion and authenticity of his work that simultaneously presents upbeat and absurdly catchy choruses in every track.
To our national pun master - we do indeed give you a Sea Of Approval.

- Angel Nikijuluw 

Yeah, I’m rather enjoying this one.

homebodynobodies:

SEA OF APPROVAL - ANDY BULL (REVIEW)
Island/Universal Records
Released: July 11, 2014

It’s very rare that an album can be so encapsulating and so powerful that it can transport you to an alternate world. Sea Of Approval, is one of those albums.

Very few artists have the ability to invite the listener into entering a multitude of sentiments within 10 tracks - which Andy Bull has executed faultlessly in his latest LP, out today.

Opening with a haunting, gripping track, Just One Expression Just One Line is the start of something completely unexpected and majorly impressive - 45 minutes of a carefully constructed record that solidifies Bull’s abilities to emotionally manipulate through exceptional hooks and formidable synths.

Jumping in with a more upbeat track, Baby I Am Nobody Now presents just a small taste of how complex and effortless Bull’s capability to transform the ambience of the record - yet still adhering to his clean-cut electro-pop sound.

It is the contrasting shift from Something I Guess to Keep On Running and Talk Too Much once again shows the intricacy of Andy Bull’s art form - providing strong rhythms with even more emotionally swaying vocals. 

Each carefully constructed component of Sea Of Approval manages to shift the mood and tone several times throughout, enabling the listener to endure every inch of emotion that each lyric carries. It is ridiculously easy to get emotionally attached to Sea Of Approval within the first listen, which is subjectively hard considering its heavy electro-pop nature of the record; but it is Bull’s evident passion and authenticity of his work that simultaneously presents upbeat and absurdly catchy choruses in every track.

To our national pun master - we do indeed give you a Sea Of Approval.

- Angel Nikijuluw 

Yeah, I’m rather enjoying this one.

moarrrmagazine:

The River Collection 
hipercool wood/glass furnitures by Greg Klassen

(via brentammm)

Nature and Noise: Photography by Anna Marinenko

(Source: fer1972, via jewmanji)

(Source: ummhello, via 1ppi)

utilitarianthings:


Fabrack is a hanging storage solution for refrigerators. It puts food on display so that fresh items aren’t hidden in drawers and forgotten.


ugh, i love this

utilitarianthings:

Fabrack is a hanging storage solution for refrigerators. It puts food on display so that fresh items aren’t hidden in drawers and forgotten.

ugh, i love this

(via brentammm)

"Books break the shackles of time, proof that humans can work magic."

Carl Sagan, Cosmos (via bookmania)

(via officialnycfangirl)

mindfuckmath:

The Quest for Randomness
What does it mean when something is random?  Is true randomness possible or is everything determined?  Can you measure randomness?  All of these questions are posed and pondered in this excellent article by Scott Aaronson.

A fun, interesting read; and now, after occasional shower thoughts on the subject, I can rest assured that random randomness is truly random.

mindfuckmath:

The Quest for Randomness

What does it mean when something is random?  Is true randomness possible or is everything determined?  Can you measure randomness?  All of these questions are posed and pondered in this excellent article by Scott Aaronson.

A fun, interesting read; and now, after occasional shower thoughts on the subject, I can rest assured that random randomness is truly random.

fungi:

All the planets as one

fungi:

All the planets as one

blaaargh:

Adam Fuss, Now!, 1988
"Fuss’s outsized photogram records time and energy rather than material form. His large sheet of photographic paper, floating in a tray of water, was exposed to a bright flash of light at the very moment—Now!—when he splashed a bucket of water onto it. The plunging of the water on the paper’s "landscape" and the rippling concentric waves and myriad individual droplets on the water’s surface were all recorded on Fuss’s sheet, but the abstract pattern seems rather to record the birth of a solar system or the splitting of atoms."

blaaargh:

Adam FussNow!, 1988

"Fuss’s outsized photogram records time and energy rather than material form. His large sheet of photographic paper, floating in a tray of water, was exposed to a bright flash of light at the very moment—Now!—when he splashed a bucket of water onto it. The plunging of the water on the paper’s "landscape" and the rippling concentric waves and myriad individual droplets on the water’s surface were all recorded on Fuss’s sheet, but the abstract pattern seems rather to record the birth of a solar system or the splitting of atoms."