Scientists from IBM and the German Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) have built the world’s smallest magnetic data storage unit. It uses just twelve atoms per bit, the basic unit of information, and squeezes a whole byte (8 bit) into as few as 96 atoms. A modern hard drive, for comparison, still needs more than half a billion atoms per byte.…
"Looking at the shrinking of electronics components we wanted to know if this can be driven into the realm of single atoms," explains Loth. But instead of shrinking existing components the team chose the opposite approach: "Starting with the smallest thing — single atoms — we built data storage devices one atom at a time," says IBM research staff member Andreas Heinrich… 
"We tested how large we have to build our unit to reach the realm of classical physics," explains Loth, who moved from IBM to CFEL four months ago. Twelve atoms emerged as the minimum with the elements used. "Beneath this threshold quantum effects blur the stored information." If these quantum effects can somehow be employed for an even denser data storage is currently a topic of intense research.With their experiments the team have not only built the smallest magnetic data storage unit ever, but have also created an ideal testbed for the transition from classical to quantum physics. “We have learned to control quantum effects through form and size of the iron atom rows,” explains Loth, leader of the Max Planck research group ‘dynamics of nanoelectric systems’ at CFEL in Hamburg and the Max-Planck-Institute for Solid State Research at Stuttgart, Germany. “We can now use this ability to investigate how quantum mechanics kicks in. What seperates quantum magnets from classical magnets? How does a magnet behave at the frontier between both worlds? These are exciting questions that soon could be answered.”
(via World’s smallest magnetic data storage unit)

Scientists from IBM and the German Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) have built the world’s smallest magnetic data storage unit. It uses just twelve atoms per bit, the basic unit of information, and squeezes a whole byte (8 bit) into as few as 96 atoms. A modern hard drive, for comparison, still needs more than half a billion atoms per byte.

"Looking at the shrinking of electronics components we wanted to know if this can be driven into the realm of single atoms," explains Loth. But instead of shrinking existing components the team chose the opposite approach: "Starting with the smallest thing — single atoms — we built data storage devices one atom at a time," says IBM research staff member Andreas Heinrich…

"We tested how large we have to build our unit to reach the realm of classical physics," explains Loth, who moved from IBM to CFEL four months ago. Twelve atoms emerged as the minimum with the elements used. "Beneath this threshold quantum effects blur the stored information." If these quantum effects can somehow be employed for an even denser data storage is currently a topic of intense research.

With their experiments the team have not only built the smallest magnetic data storage unit ever, but have also created an ideal testbed for the transition from classical to quantum physics. “We have learned to control quantum effects through form and size of the iron atom rows,” explains Loth, leader of the Max Planck research group ‘dynamics of nanoelectric systems’ at CFEL in Hamburg and the Max-Planck-Institute for Solid State Research at Stuttgart, Germany. “We can now use this ability to investigate how quantum mechanics kicks in. What seperates quantum magnets from classical magnets? How does a magnet behave at the frontier between both worlds? These are exciting questions that soon could be answered.”

(via World’s smallest magnetic data storage unit)