Spoiler: I find most things fascinating.
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Reblogged from utnereader  184 notes
utnereader:

“All meat is not created equal,” reads a new report from the Environmental Working Group (EWG). The “Meat Eater’s Guide to Climate Change + Health” evaluates 20 common protein-rich foods to determine the healthiest picks for the planet and for our bodies.
The best bet is the friendly lentil. The worst offenders? Lamb, beef, and (say it ain’t so!) cheese. Read more …

utnereader:

“All meat is not created equal,” reads a new report from the Environmental Working Group (EWG). The “Meat Eater’s Guide to Climate Change + Health” evaluates 20 common protein-rich foods to determine the healthiest picks for the planet and for our bodies.

The best bet is the friendly lentil. The worst offenders? Lamb, beef, and (say it ain’t so!) cheese. Read more …

Reblogged from damnarbor  19 notes
imthedroidyourelookingfor:

What’s in season? I was sitting at the market, drinking my latte and devouring my delicious pain au chocolate, when two nice women joined me at the table. We were discussing the market, and how nice it is to shop there.
One of the women told me she wanted to buy brussel sprouts. Yes, brussel sprouts in June. It surprised me, that she was at least 50 years old, had been shopping at the market for years, and had no idea about seasonality. I guess that’s one of the troubles with a market that has both vendors and producers. Some people can’t tell the difference between what comes from half way around the world, versus what is grown in our own back yard. Of course it is even more complicated with hoop houses extending the growing season, which may confuse people even more (for example, the baby beets I bought were grown in a hoop house). 
I wish I had a copy of the chart with me on Saturday, to give out as needed. And yes, I did her a favor and kindly explained that she wouldn’t find brussel sprouts in June, and even if she did see them there, she should simply wait until the fall, when they are really available. 

imthedroidyourelookingfor:

What’s in season? I was sitting at the market, drinking my latte and devouring my delicious pain au chocolate, when two nice women joined me at the table. We were discussing the market, and how nice it is to shop there.

One of the women told me she wanted to buy brussel sprouts. Yes, brussel sprouts in June. It surprised me, that she was at least 50 years old, had been shopping at the market for years, and had no idea about seasonality. I guess that’s one of the troubles with a market that has both vendors and producers. Some people can’t tell the difference between what comes from half way around the world, versus what is grown in our own back yard. Of course it is even more complicated with hoop houses extending the growing season, which may confuse people even more (for example, the baby beets I bought were grown in a hoop house). 

I wish I had a copy of the chart with me on Saturday, to give out as needed. And yes, I did her a favor and kindly explained that she wouldn’t find brussel sprouts in June, and even if she did see them there, she should simply wait until the fall, when they are really available.